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World Neurosurgery


 

A Novel Virtual Reality Simulator for Hemostasis in a Brain Surgical Cavity: Perceived Utility for Visuomotor Skills in Current and Aspiring Neurosurgery Residents


54 participants, made up of 14 medical residents, 20 senior medical students, and 20 junior medical students, were asked to complete a simulation task on the ImmersiveTouch training platform that established bipolar hemostasis in a virtual brain cavity. They were then asked to quantitatively assess whether simulator use in surgical training could influence the development of hand-eye coordination, depth perception, and general surgical skills.

Among residents, 86% felt simulator use could positively influence hand-eye coordination, 86% felt simulator use could positively improve depth perception, and 79% felt simulator use could positively influence the acquisition of general OR surgical skills. Among senior medical students, 100% felt simulator use could positively influence hand-eye coordination, 100% felt the same pertaining to depth perception, and 100% felt the same pertaining to acquisition of general OR surgical skills. Among junior medical students, the numbers were 100%, 95%, and 100%, respectively. Overall, 96.2% of participants found the simulation somewhat or very useful in improving eye-hand coordination, and 94% considered it beneficial to improve depth perception and operating room skills.

“Simulation training may be useful for learning certain surgical procedures or tasks on the basis of the overall well-perceived usefulness by the subjects.”


Gasco, J.; Patel, A.; Luciano, C., et al. A Novel Virtual Reality Simulator for Hemostasis in a Brain Surgical Cavity: Perceived Utility for Visuomotor Skills in Current and Aspiring Neurosurgery Residents. World Neurosurgery. 2013 Dec; 80(6): 732-737.

 
 

 

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